Philippa Lincoln

PhD, University of Aberdeen, 2008; MSc Environmental Forestry, University of Wales, 2003; BSc (Hons) Tropical Environmental Science, University of Aberdeen, 2000.

Philippa is an expert on forest and climate change issues with a particular focus on REDD+ and 10 years’ experience. Her expertise bridges forest ecology, sustainable forest management, forest-based climate change mitigation, statistical analysis and technical evaluation design. She has strong research skills and a PhD on the climate benefits of reduced-impact logging. Philippa also has extensive current knowledge of REDD+ issues and approaches, including the UNFCCC REDD+ process, multilateral and national REDD+ processes, REDD+ policies, issues and pilots. Philippa coordinated, codesigned and provided technical inputs to a four-year real-time evaluation of Norway’s International Climate and Forest Initiative, the world’s largest donor REDD+ initiative, and the largest development evaluation ever undertaken by the Norwegian government. Her technical work focused on international and national REDD+ policy, national REDD+ processes, MRV and reference levels, research, civil society and pilot projects and initiatives. She has worked on forest issues in Africa (Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda), Southeast Asia (Malaysia and Indonesia), Central and South America (Costa Rica and Guyana). Philippa has excellent analytical and project management skills and strong experience in the co-ordination and management of complex programmes, including large and diverse international teams and local counterparts.

Evaluation of the Sustainability Dimension in Addressing Poverty Reduction

Poverty reduction was an overarching goal of the Finnish development cooperation strategy since 1993 through to the current Development Policy of 2007. The purpose of the evaluation was to identify concrete results and achievements in the Finnish development cooperation, with particular reference to the sustainable development approach. LTS undertook a desk study which was followed by field work in the following countries: Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia, Vietnam, Laos, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia.

The study investigated the poverty reduction outcomes that have taken place in relation to the application of the sustainability concept at a macro level in Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) partner countries; assessed the extent to which MFA interventions since 2000 have made a contribution to these changes through co-operation on forestry and biological resources; drew out lessons from past experiences and thinking, in particular looking for best practice, constraints and innovations; and consequently; identified how MFA interventions could achieve greater impact. The evaluation was guided by the OECD/DAC norms and quality standards for development evaluation.

Mid Term Review of Indigenous Methods to Sustainably Manage Riverine Plantations, Amazon Region

A Mid Term Review of Darwin Initiative project no. 12-016, ‘Indigenous methods to sustainably manage riverine plantations, Amazon region’, Colombia, was undertaken during the period 22 – 30 November 2004. The project lead institutions were the University of Strathclyde and the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, with many local institutions participating. The purpose of the project was to work together with indigenous specialists, institutions and communities to investigate and promote methods of sustainable management of riverine plantations on periodically flooded banks of the River Amazon and tributaries in the frontier region with Brazil and Peru.