Project
 
2014 - 2018


Malawi:

Implementation Service Provider for Catchment Management

Key Staff:

William Apted


The Shire River Basin is Malawi’s single most important water resource, supporting the country’s key economic sectors including food production, transport, energy, tourism, agriculture and fisheries. The Shire River Basin Management Program (SRBMP) aims to increase sustainable social, economic and environmental benefits by effectively and collaboratively planning, developing and managing the Shire River Basin’s natural resources. LTS and consortium partners are implementing the first phase of the SRBMP by Malawi’s Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Water Development. The World Bank financed project is being implemented to improve land and water management and protect and enhance the Shire River ecosystem, while providing livelihood benefits in target areas.

The programme is made up of three components – Shire basin planning, catchment management and water related infrastructure – and the consortium is responsible for the catchment management component. In order to achieve its objectives, LTS is assisting the Government:

  • Develop institutional capacity for catchment planning and monitoring;
  • Finance interventions identified in micro-catchment plans prepared under the above mentioned planning phase;
  • Support demand and market driven income-generating activities, with special targeting of women, youth and landless groups, to gradually decrease dependency on low performance agriculture and unsustainable harvesting of forest products as sources of income.

This will aim to rehabilitate four catchments – Upper Lisungwi, Upper Wamkulumadzi, Kapichira Falls and Chingale – covering a combined area of approximately 133,000 ha. The consortium will develop methods to reduce soil erosion, utilise soil conservation methods and improve and diversify livelihoods.

Challenges:

Some of the major challenges being faced in the Shire River Basin are deforestation in upper catchments & along river banks resulting from fuel wood harvesting, charcoal production and conversion of land to agricultural use. Droughts are frequent and there is high reliance on rain-fed agriculture which results in food insecurity in dry years. To address these issues, four sub-components involving planning, capacity development, water and soil interventions, small economic activities and ecological management are being implemented under Catchment Management.

Solutions:

The solutions to the challenges fall under three key stages at the catchment level:

  • Building conditions for catchment rehabilitation and alternative livelihood development which includes community sensitisation, social mobilisation, development of plans (catchment, sub-catchment, micro-catchment and village levels) and capacity building to ensure ownership and a strong foundation for subsequent interventions;
  • Implementation of catchment development plans and alternative rural livelihoods, and;
  • Continuing financial and technical support for catchment rehabilitation and livelihood activities while phasing-out project activities.

LTS works closely with MottMacdonald and CDM on across these components, playing a leading role in supporting capacity building for planning (working with village level planning institutions and communities), delivering an environmental assessment plan of income generating activities, and providing training and technical support to local enterprises in the non-agricultural sector.

Activities on rehabilitation and management of degraded catchments are being implemented in four priority catchment areas of Upper Lisungwi (25,956 ha) in Ntcheu district; Upper Wamkulumadzi (29,556 ha) in Neno district; Kapichira (33,157 ha) in Blantyre district, and; Chingale (41,258 ha) in Zomba and Machinga districts.  Ecological management of protected areas activities are also being implemented in Forest Reserves and National Parks within the Basin.

Value and Benefits:

The Shire River Basin is Malawi’s single most important water resource, supporting the country’s key economic sectors including food production, transport, energy, tourism, agriculture and fisheries. The aim of the programme is to increase sustainable social, economic and environmental benefits of the basin by effectively and collaboratively planning, developing and managing its natural resources. Since the activities promoted ideally require a longer time horizon than the project duration, this project aim to institutionalize a successful approach and show early results that will be expanded upon and consolidated through the next phase in the program.



Clients: World Bank


Services:




Practices:




Geography: Malawi

Date: 2014 - 2018

Keywords: Community-based natural resource management, Catchment Management, Rural Livelihoods
 
 


ACQ5 Global Awards 2018: LTS awarded Environmental Project Management Firm of the Year and LTS Managing Director Pa… https://t.co/7sYz9aIryt
linkedin facebook twitter
© LTS International
our projects