Home > Helping to better understand the fiscal and regulatory mechanisms necessary to achieve CCD in the coastal zone

Helping to better understand the fiscal and regulatory mechanisms necessary to achieve CCD in the coastal zone

iCoast

LTS has been awarded a contract by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) to lead on the policy analysis and the economic analysis of the iCoast project in Kenya and Sri Lanka.

The iCoast project will conduct evidentiary analysis in Sri Lanka and Kenya of the social, cultural, political, economic and environmental barriers to climate compatible development (CCD) implementation at the coastal zone; develop cost-curves of applying CCD to the coastal zone using newly tested benefit transfer methodologies; map the fiscal and regulatory mechanisms necessary to achieve CCD in the coastal zone of Kenya and Sri Lanka under different market scenarios; and map the value of coastal landscapes and their potential to support CCD in the coastal zone highlighting priority areas for attention in the short, medium and long-term national strategies.

Coasts are regions of great importance for human well being and are of national economic importance for coastal states. Coastal ecosystems provide numerous ecosystem services supporting a significant proportion of the world’s population, particularly in developing countries but are some of the most vulnerable to climate change. Despite their importance, coastal ecosystems continue to degrade, challenging climate resilience in coastal developing countries.

map
Service areas:
redd
FLEGT
climate change
m&E
water
ecosystems