Contract award: Scaling out Devolved Climate Finance in Tanzania

LTSA is providing Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning (ME&L) to the Scaling up Devolved Climate Finance in Tanzania project. LTSA will be developing an ME&L strategy, build the M&E capacity of various government institutions and provide ongoing technical advice, support and training where necessary to the project MEL Coordinator.

Scaling out Devolved Climate Finance in Tanzania

LTSA is providing Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning to the Scaling up Devolved Climate Finance in Tanzania project. The project aims to establish local level climate adaptation funds in 15 districts in Tanzania and 13 in Zanzibar.

The five year project, running from April 2016 – 2021, will deliver 4 outputs:

  1. Functional devolved district climate finance and planning mechanisms in 15 districts on mainland Tanzania to finance community-prioritised investments in public goods that build climate resilience.
  2. PO-RALG develop the institutional and financial competencies to scale-up devolved climate finance in support of community-driven adaptation across Tanzania.
  3. Revolutionary Government of Zanzibar develops competencies to use public finance management systems to deliver results based finance for investment in local adaptation.
  4. Evidence and learning on the effectiveness of devolved climate finance investments to improve community resilience, differentiated by gender, is generated and used to inform policy.

The work complements the goals outlined in both Tanzania and Zanzibar’s national climate change strategies, in which institutions and policies are to be established at national level for climate change planning including a climate change finance mechanism. Delivery of the outputs will enable the Governments of Tanzania and Zanzibar to effectively draw down, disburse and monitor the effectiveness of finance from national and international sources to support the building of resilient, economically productive livelihoods, and a climate resilient economy. Currently, there are very few models for the decentralisation of climate finance. This project will provide practical experience and a tested model for effective and robust disbursement of funds to promote adaptation to climate change that can be replicated throughout Tanzania and Zanzibar.

LTS is undertaking the following tasks:

  • Developing a comprehensive Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning (MEL) strategy, in collaboration with consortium partners. The strategy will justify and explain tracking of project outcomes, detail a justified capacity building plan on M&E for Tanzanian consortium partners and “capture a wide variety of innovative solutions, especially from the rural areas, and illustrate how they have successfully helped communities to mitigate and adapt to climate change”.
  • Capacity building – implement capacity building in Tanzania and Zanzibar of PO-RALG, Districts, DvAPC and IRDP in accordance with the capacity development plan. This will include both classroom training and “on-the-job” mentoring. Feedback will be collected on training sessions to evaluate quality and support subsequent trainings. A measurable mentoring plan will also be developed and assessed annually.
  • Mentoring – provide ongoing technical advice, support and training where necessary to the MEL Coordinator and to the project in general on climate resilience measurements and M&E requirements, including on TAMD approaches in monitoring and community engagement.
  • Attend and contribute to Consortium meetings and decision making where necessary.

Photo credits to Richard Davis

Mid-term Review of Malawi Livelihood programs

The Royal Norwegian Embassy in Lilongwe signed four new development programmes within the Agriculture and Food Security Portfolio in 2014, all of which have an agreement period of five years.

All four contracts specify that a Mid Term Review shall be conducted by November 2016, and these must be covered above the grant. The main purpose of the assignment is to assess the achievement of the programs against the goals, impacts and outputs outlined in the projects document, and propose recommendations for future work and support.

The main purpose of the services provided will be:

  • Assess the achievements of the projects against the stated goals, impacts and outputs; and
  • Assess the relevance of these projects to the national food security policies, and overall Norwegian development objectives in Malawi.

Contract award: Mid-term Review of Malawi Livelihood programs

The Royal Norwegian Embassy in Lilongwe signed four new development programmes within the Agriculture and Food Security Portfolio in 2014, all of which have an agreement period of five years.

LTS has been contracted by NORAD for the Mid Term Review of these programmes. The main purpose of the assignment is to assess the achievement of the programs against the goals, impacts and outputs outlined in the projects document, and propose recommendations for future work and support.

Multi Stakeholder Forestry Programme

The Multi-stakeholder Forestry Programme (MSFP) builds on the achievements of over 20 years of forestry work by the Government of Nepal, supported by the UK, Switzerland and Finland. Community forestry has delivered significant impacts in reducing poverty and in building the capacity of community forest user groups, Government, and non-state actors to improve the sustainability of forest management.

The objective of this assignment is to produce two synthesis papers. The first summarising lessons learnt about the impacts of DFID’s Multi Stakeholder Forestry Programme in Nepal (the Impacts Paper), and the second to assess the effectiveness of the MSFP programme modality in delivering programme outputs and outcomes (the Modality Paper). Each paper is to be no more than ten pages in length and will be complemented by a two page summary paper.

The papers will be used to inform DFID’s Project Completion Report of MSFP. It will also be used to share the experience of MSFP with DFID Advisers, DFID Senior Management and, where appropriate, with the international forestry community. The lessons presented in the papers will be of wider relevance to DFID programming in Nepal and beyond.

Contract award: Nepal Multi-stakeholder Forestry Programme (MSFP) – Lessons Learnt Papers 1 & 2

The Multi-stakeholder Forestry Programme (MSFP) builds on the achievements of over 20 years of forestry work by the Government of Nepal supported by the UK, Switzerland and Finland. Community forestry has delivered significant impacts in reducing poverty; and in building the capacity of community forest user groups, the government, and non-state actors to improve the sustainability of forest management.

LTS has been contracted for producing two synthesis papers. The first summarising lessons learnt about the impacts of DFID’s Multi Stakeholder Forestry Programme in Nepal (the Impacts Paper), the second to assess the effectiveness of the MSFP programme modality in delivering programme outputs and outcomes (the Modality Paper). Each paper is to be no more than 10 pages in length and will be complemented by a 2 page summary paper.

Mid-Term Evaluation of the NAMA Facility

The EUR 120m NAMA Facility was officially announced by Germany and the United Kingdom (UK) at the eighteenth session of the Conference of the Parties (COP18) in Doha. Denmark and the European Commission (EC) have since contributed EUR 25m and an additional EUR 75m of UK International Climate Fund (ICF) funding was approved in 2015.

The NAMA Facility is managed by a Technical Support Unit (TSU) jointly run by Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) and KfW. The German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU); the UK Department for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy (BEIS, formerly DECC); the Danish Ministry of Climate, Energy, and Building (EFKM); the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA); and the EU Commission sit on the Facility’s Board, which approves funding for the implementation of NAMA Support Projects (NSPs).

GIZ contracted LTS International to carry out a Mid-term Evaluation (MTE) of the NAMA Facility. The objective is to analyse and improve the understanding of:

  • The strengths and weaknesses of the NAMA Facility at all levels (governance, TSU, NSP pipeline and portfolio)
  • The relevance of the NAMA Facility to different stakeholders: beneficiaries and recipient countries, donors, and delivery organisations.
  • How the management of implementation of the NAMA Facility can be further improved, including answering questions related to the funding modalities (e.g. looking at global competitive bids and how they have worked and not worked

The MTE is strongly formative: the deliverables will inform further development of the Facility and improvements in its systems. Specific questions guiding the MTE are included in the ToR. In terms of strategic relevance, the MTE will explore the role the Facility plays in the context of the wider landscape of climate financing, including its influence in relation to the NDCs and LEDS that provide the framework within which specific NAMA actions may be coordinated and supported. This includes understanding the implications of the Paris COP agreements and the capitalisation of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) on the strategic relevance of the Facility.

Image credit: NAMA Facility

 

Contract Award: Mid-Term Evaluation of the NAMA Facility

The NAMA Facility, officially announced by Germany and the United Kingdom (UK) at the eighteenth session of the Conference of the Parties (COP18) in Doha with combined funding of €120m, is now into its third year.  Denmark and the European Commission (EC) have since contributed €25m and an additional £75m of UK International Climate Fund (ICF) funding was approved in 2015. The NAMA Facility is managed by a Technical Support Unit (TSU) jointly run by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) and KfW. The German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) and UK Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) sit on the Facility’s Board, which approves funding for the implementation of NAMA Support Projects (NSPs).

GIZ has contracted LTS International to carry out a Mid-term Evaluation (MTE) of the NAMA Facility. The objective is to analyse and improve the understanding of:

  • The strengths and weaknesses of the NAMA Facility at all levels (governance, TSU, NSP pipeline and portfolio)
  • The relevance of the NAMA Facility to different stakeholders: beneficiaries and recipient countries, to Donors, to Delivery Organisations.
  • How the management of implementation of the NAMA Facility can be further improved, including answering questions related to the funding modalities (e.g. looking at global competitive bids and how they have worked and not worked

Background Paper and Analysis of Country Data to Support Development of Comprehensive Landscape Methodological Approach

The BioCarbon Fund Initiative for Sustainable Forest Landscapes (ISFL) seeks to promote reduced greenhouse gas emissions from land-use. The Initiative will support reducing deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries (REDD+), increasing sustainable agriculture, and smarter land-use planning, policies and practices. ISFL is currently operating in Colombia, Ethiopia, Indonesia, and Zambia. Contributors to the ISFL include Germany, Norway, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America.

ISFL designs programmes that focus on an integrated approach to the entire landscape with the ultimate goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and producing co-benefits such as improvements to livelihoods or agricultural productivity. For example, an ISFL programme could coordinate efforts in sustainable agricultural production projects, agro-forestry schemes, assisted natural regeneration, energy projects, water management, and REDD+ to align objectives and maximise impacts in the jurisdiction. Ultimately, jurisdictions that implement these measures are expected to generate emission reductions that can be purchased by ISFL through a results-based financing mechanism.

This project will produce a background document that will support future discussions on the development of a comprehensive landscape methodological approach. The document will: (i) describe and analyse the IPCC guidelines to ensure that ISFL Contributors have a common understanding of the guidelines and the decisions required to build the ISFL methodological approach and (ii) provide an analysis of available relevant data in ISFL countries. As part of this analysis, an understanding of the quality of data sets will also be ascertained.

LTS is leading the project, from a technical and management perspective, deploying a multi-disciplinary team of experts. The keys tasks include:

  • Provide a description of the key concepts in the IPCC guidelines to ensure that ISFL Contributors have a common understanding of the IPCC
  • Provide an analysis of available historic relevant data in ISFL programme countries
  • Identify key decisions and options going forward
  • Present and explain the results of the first three tasks to the ISFL Contributors

The main outputs include a concise background report, written for non-technical experts, and supported by evidence (in annexes).