Helping to better understand the fiscal and regulatory mechanisms necessary to achieve CCD in the coastal zone

iCoast

LTS has been awarded a contract by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) to lead on the policy analysis and the economic analysis of the iCoast project in Kenya and Sri Lanka.

The iCoast project will conduct evidentiary analysis in Sri Lanka and Kenya of the social, cultural, political, economic and environmental barriers to climate compatible development (CCD) implementation at the coastal zone; develop cost-curves of applying CCD to the coastal zone using newly tested benefit transfer methodologies; map the fiscal and regulatory mechanisms necessary to achieve CCD in the coastal zone of Kenya and Sri Lanka under different market scenarios; and map the value of coastal landscapes and their potential to support CCD in the coastal zone highlighting priority areas for attention in the short, medium and long-term national strategies.

Coasts are regions of great importance for human well being and are of national economic importance for coastal states. Coastal ecosystems provide numerous ecosystem services supporting a significant proportion of the world’s population, particularly in developing countries but are some of the most vulnerable to climate change. Despite their importance, coastal ecosystems continue to degrade, challenging climate resilience in coastal developing countries.

iCoast: Understanding the Fiscal and Regulatory Mechanisms Necessary to Achieve Climate Compatible Development in the Coastal Zone

Carbon markets, social carbon, biodiversity premiums and other PES schemes have created new opportunities for achieving triple wins: climate change adaptation, mitigation and sustainable development. However, there remains scant evidence of the fiscal and regulatory mechanisms required to deliver the incentives and governance conditions for leveraging coastal zone CCD through these emerging PES markets.

The iCoast project is conducting evidentiary analysis in Sri Lanka and Kenya of the social, cultural, political, economic and environmental barriers to CCD implementation at the coastal zone; developing cost-curves of applying CCD to the coastal zone using newly tested benefit transfer methodologies; mapping the fiscal and regulatory mechanisms necessary to achieve CCD in the coastal zone of Kenya and Sri Lanka under different market scenarios; and mapping the value of coastal landscapes and their potential to support CCD in the coastal zone highlighting priority areas for attention in the short, medium and long-term national strategies.

LTS is leading on the policy analysis and the economic analysis of this project in Kenya and Sri Lanka.

For a full executive summary of the project please download the project overview here.

The policy brief “What the Future Holds”, which was a key output of this project, can be downloaded here.

LTS-led consortium’s evaluation of Norway’s International Climate and Forest Initiative’s (NICFI) support to Civil Society published at public seminar in Oslo and now available online

Pat Hardcastle Technical Director of the evaluation, Project Direct Chris Inglis and Senior Consultant Philippa Lincoln led a team including representatives of consortium partners Indufor, CMI, Ecometrica, during the presentation of results at a public meeting in Oslo.

Through its Civil Society Support Scheme, NICFI has provided grants to over 40 civil society and research institutions to implement projects related to Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) in developing countries. Projects range from primary research into technical aspects of REDD+, to policy advocacy and work on safeguards, to capacity building and REDD+ demonstrations.

The principle purpose of the evaluation was to determine whether the NICFI investment of over 650 million Norwegian kroner in support to civil society was on target to help the Initiative reach its overall climate and development goals.

The evaluation team found that projects were contributing to the development of an enabling environment for REDD+, were contributing to the development of national REDD+ strategies with a strong focus on social safeguards and the rights of Indigenous Peoples. In addition, projects were generating useful new knowledge and supporting local partners to become strong REDD+ actors in their own right.

The team recommended ways in which reporting systems and knowledge management processes might be improved. The NICFI management team have rapidly adopted the principle recommendations of the evaluation and have  initiated discussions on how best to  address these issues with a view to improving internal systems and better capturing new knowledge generated by the projects.

 

Read the full report here

Following the public seminar political advisor to Norway’s Ministry of Environment, Mr Audun  Garberg commented that the report will aid the development of Norway’s policies for strengthening civil society in developing countries in the context of forests and climate change.

 

Proceedings now available of the LTS-attended Asia-Pacific Workshop on Reduced Impact Logging

At the invitation of the UN Food and Agriculture Association (FAO), our Senior Consultant Dr Philippa Lincoln recently attended a meeting of 28 experts in the fields of Reduced Impact Logging (RIL), forest carbon and  efforts to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+), held in Malaysia on the 3rd and 4th of May 2012.  The meeting, organised by FAO and the Lowering Emissions from Asia’s Forests (LEAF)  programme, explored issues around integrating RIL into the forest carbon markets; Monitoring, Reporting and Verification  of forest carbon, degradation and management; the financial costs of integrating RIL into the forest carbon economy; and the best methods for encouraging the adoption of RIL practices.

The workshop generated a number of key findings:

1. Implementation of RIL can substantially reduce the environmental impacts of timber harvesting and reduce the emission of CO2, by as much as 40% compared with conventional logging (CL). Much of the carbon gain from RIL is associated with the retention of forest in buffers (streams, steep country etc), as well as through less waste and damage to residual growing stock.

2.  Whether RIL is more profitable than conventional logging (CL) depends upon the spatial and temporal scales of analysis. Financial cost savings and long-term economic benefits of RIL derive from better planning and training of workers in felling and bucking techniques as well as from the careful design and use of logging roads and skid trails. Short-term profit margins are reduced when RIL protocols require the protection of riparian buffer zones and the avoidance of logging on steep slopes.

3. The wider uptake of RIL continues to be hampered by concerns over its higher cost and loss of resource compared with conventional logging. However, there are encouraging signs of progress.

4. RIL has a key role to play in reducing forest degradation under REDD+.

The findings of the workshop will be used to develop an action plan that will detail the strategies by which RIL can be promoted to international and national bodies, negotiators and the media as a key component of measures for reducing forest degradation and CO2 emissions under REDD+.

The Proceedings of the meeting, along with further details of the workshop, including downloadable presentations, the Concept Note and Agenda and participant list are available now on the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) website.

Workshop participants (courtesy of the FAO)